Around the Tuscan Table

Food, Family, and Gender in Twentieth-century Florence

Around the Tuscan Table

In this delicious book, noted food scholar Carole M. Counihan presents a compelling and artfully told narrative about family and food in late 20th-century Florence. Based on solid research, Counihan examines how family, and especially gender have changed in Florence since the end of World War II to the present, giving us a portrait of the changing nature of modern life as exemplified through food and foodways.

From Tables Tuscan Women

From Tables Tuscan Women

A Tuscan cookbook with a difference, From the Tables of Tuscan Women turns its gaze away from the overly familiar areas of Florence and Siena, and looks westward to the less familiar province of Lucca. Tuscany's most diverse province geographically, Lucca spans mountains and forests, olive groves and terraced vineyards, with a pristine coastline on the Tyrrhenian Sea. The cuisine of Lucca reflects both the richness of this diversity and the wealth of ingredients it provides -- from fritto misto di pesce, an assortment of fish battered and fried in olive oil, to cacciucci, a soup made entirely of fish and served on thick slices of toasted bread rubbed with garlic, to castagnaccia a sweet cake made with chestnut flour. Integral to the way of life there, Lucchesian food is inextricably bound up with the character of its people and their "uniquely Mediterranean lifestyle that mixes marvelous climate, a relaxed attitude, and an unrelenting passion of sitting down at the table," as Anne Bianchi says in her introduction. So, in order to most fully give the flavor of the cuisine of Lucca, Anne Bianchi, who has spent much of her life in Tuscany, introduces us to the spirit of the province and the soul of any Tuscan meal: its people. "No people anywhere in the world are more dramatic, outspoken, or riotously arrogant," she writes. In these pages we meet nine amazing Tuscan women, "hear their stories, stroll through their towns, and sample the best of their recipes." These virtuoso chefs share their secrets and opinions on everything from sauces to politics, spicing their conversation with witty and revealing anecdotes of life in their rural villages. Accompanied by lively photos, From the Tables of Tuscan Women gives intimate access to the culinary recipes and traditions of Lucca while offering an incomparable Tuscan experience. The voracious reader and adventurous cook will find new roads down which to travel, as well as sumptuous dishes to sample -- whose recipes can be easily replicated in American kitchens.

A Tortilla Is Like Life

Food and Culture in the San Luis Valley of Colorado

A Tortilla Is Like Life

Located in the southern San Luis Valley of Colorado, the remote and relatively unknown town of Antonito is home to an overwhelmingly Hispanic population struggling not only to exist in an economically depressed and politically marginalized area, but also to preserve their culture and their lifeways. Between 1996 and 2006, anthropologist Carole Counihan collected food-centered life histories from nineteen Mexicanas—Hispanic American women—who had long-standing roots in the Upper Rio Grande region. The interviews in this groundbreaking study focused on southern Colorado Hispanic foodways—beliefs and behaviors surrounding food production, distribution, preparation, and consumption. In this book, Counihan features extensive excerpts from these interviews to give voice to the women of Antonito and highlight their perspectives. Three lines of inquiry are framed: feminist ethnography, Latino cultural citizenship, and Chicano environmentalism. Counihan documents how Antonito's Mexicanas establish a sense of place and belonging through their knowledge of land and water and use this knowledge to sustain their families and communities. Women play an important role by gardening, canning, and drying vegetables; earning money to buy food; cooking; and feeding family, friends, and neighbors on ordinary and festive occasions. They use food to solder or break relationships and to express contrasting feelings of harmony and generosity, or enmity and envy. The interviews in this book reveal that these Mexicanas are resourceful providers whose food work contributes to cultural survival.

In Tuscany

In Tuscany

Text and photographs celebrate Tuscany's feasts, festivals, food, wine, people, and culture.

Edible Histories, Cultural Politics

Towards a Canadian Food History

Edible Histories, Cultural Politics

Just as the Canada's rich past resists any singular narrative, there is no such thing as a singular Canadian food tradition. This new book explores Canada's diverse food cultures and the varied relationships that Canadians have had historically with food practices in the context of community, region, nation and beyond. Based on findings from menus, cookbooks, government documents, advertisements, media sources, oral histories, memoirs, and archival collections, Edible Histories offers a veritable feast of original research on Canada's food history and its relationship to culture and politics. This exciting collection explores a wide variety of topics, including urban restaurant culture, ethnic cuisines, and the controversial history of margarine in Canada. It also covers a broad time-span, from early contact between European settlers and First Nations through the end of the twentieth century. Edible Histories intertwines information of Canada's 'foodways' – the practices and traditions associated with food and food preparation – and stories of immigration, politics, gender, economics, science, medicine and religion. Sophisticated, culturally sensitive, and accessible, Edible Histories will appeal to students, historians, and foodies alike.

Murder at the Gardner

Murder at the Gardner

Investigating a lighthearted prankster, Homer Kelly finds murder instead There are frogs in the pond at the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum. A balloon has been tied to one of the sculptures in the small museum’s hallowed halls. And, worst of all, someone has moved paintings while no one was looking. At most museums these pranks would be an annoyance, but at the Gardner—whose founder stipulated that the museum be disbanded if the original collection is ever disturbed—they could spell disaster. The Gardner’s board hires Harvard professor and former police lieutenant Homer Kelly to investigate the mischief. Hardly an art lover, Kelly has trouble taking the threat seriously at first. But when a museum patron is found dead after catching the prankster in the act, Homer springs into action. He may know nothing about art, but murder is something he understands all too well.

The Oxford Handbook of the History of Consumption

The Oxford Handbook of the History of Consumption

The term 'consumption' covers the desire for goods and services, their acquisition, use, and disposal. The study of consumption has grown enormously in recent years, and it has been the subject of major historiographical debates: did the eighteenth century bring a consumer revolution? Was there a great divergence between East and West? Did the twentieth century see the triumph of global consumerism? Questions of consumption have become defining topics in all branches of history, from gender and labour history to political history and cultural studies. The Oxford Handbook of the History of Consumption offers a timely overview of how our understanding of consumption in history has changed in the last generation, taking the reader from the ancient period to the twenty-first century. It includes chapters on Asia, Europe, Africa, and North America, brings together new perspectives, highlights cutting-edge areas of research, and offers a guide through the main historiographical developments. Contributions from leading historians examine the spaces of consumption, consumer politics, luxury and waste, nationalism and empire, the body, well-being, youth cultures, and fashion. The Handbook also showcases the different ways in which recent historians have approached the subject, from cultural and economic history to political history and technology studies, including areas where multidisciplinary approaches have been especially fruitful.

Food Culture in the Mediterranean

Food Culture in the Mediterranean

This one-stop source provides the broadest possible understanding of food culture throughout the region, from the Europe Mediterranean to the North African and Levant Mediterranean.

Taking Food Public

Redefining Foodways in a Changing World

Taking Food Public

The field of food studies has been growing rapidly over the last thirty years and has exploded since the turn of the millennium. Scholars from an array of disciplines have trained fresh theoretical and methodological approaches onto new dimensions of the human relationship to food. This anthology capitalizes on this particular cultural moment to bring to the fore recent scholarship that focuses on innovative ways people are recasting food in public spaces to challenge hegemonic practices and meanings. Organized into five interrelated sections on food production – consumption, performance, Diasporas, and activism – articles aim to provide new perspectives on the changing meanings and uses of food in the twenty-first century.

Uncertain Tastes

Memory, Ambivalence, and the Politics of Eating in Samburu, Northern Kenya

Uncertain Tastes

This richly drawn ethnography of Samburu cattle herders in northern Kenya examines the effects of an epochal shift in their basic diet-from a regimen of milk, meat, and blood to one of purchased agricultural products. In his innovative analysis, Jon Holtzman uses food as a way to contextualize and measure the profound changes occurring in Samburu social and material life. He shows that if Samburu reaction to the new foods is primarily negative—they are referred to disparagingly as "gray food" and "government food"—it is also deeply ambivalent. For example, the Samburu attribute a host of social maladies to these dietary changes, including selfishness and moral decay. Yet because the new foods save lives during famines, the same individuals also talk of the triumph of reason over an antiquated culture and speak enthusiastically of a better life where there is less struggle to find food. Through detailed analysis of a range of food-centered arenas, Uncertain Tastes argues that the experience of food itself—symbolic, sensuous, social, and material-is intrinsically characterized by multiple and frequently conflicting layers.