Death Confetti

Pickers, Punks, and Transit Ghosts in Portland, Oregon

Death Confetti

With savage humor, Death Confetti features performance artist Jennifer Robin's autobiographical sketches of Portland, Oregon, from the grunge-era obscurity of the '90s to its current media-darling status. As an only child raised by reclusive grandparents in upstate New York, Jennifer recalls that she felt "anemic for the real." At seventeen she broke loose and made her way to the west coast. "Civilization is a nightmare-illusion," Jennifer writes, "a three-dimensional spreadsheet perpetuated by machines that hypnotize meat." In a city that's stranger than fiction, grocery-store checkers and meth-heads loom as lost gods. We're introduced to the lady tweaker "Chew Toy," who wears moon boots and sings hair metal songs all night as she collects recyclable bottles. Jennifer visits a bar where executives simulate doggie-style sex acts on the dance floor. Then there's all the tales of late-night life on the city's buses and light rail. Jennifer reflects on her early terror in Catholic school and phone calls with her far-out mother, who disclosed that her gynecologist was a murderer. In the all-too-true pages of Death Confetti, Robin remembers her life among noise musicians, junkies, and her escape from a boyfriend who insisted on reviving the lives of hundreds of deceased fruit flies. Death Confetti jolts the senses, and lingers like a mosquito bite to the Portland of everybody's soul.

Galileo's Revenge

or, A Cure for the Itch

Galileo's Revenge

Florence, October 1587. The Duke of Tuscany drops dead unexpectedly. His brother the Cardinal starts a hunt for his assassin. Or for a suitable scapegoat? Galileo, a brilliant, impecunious - and unscrupulous - young scientist, is struggling to make a name for himself at the corrupt court of the Medici. He is horrified to be arrested as the Duke's murderer: nothing burns so well as a wicked magician! His only hope is to find the real killer - or, at least, a better scapegoat. His search takes him through the piazzas and palaces of Florence, through the barber-shops and brothels, the cloisters and the taverns. Especially the taverns.

Baudrillard's Bestiary

Baudrillard and Culture

Baudrillard's Bestiary

Drawing on several of Baudrillard's key writings which are still only available in French, Gane provides us with the essential guide to Baudrillard as cultural critic.

The House Sitter

The House Sitter

The corpse of a beautiful woman, clad in only a bathing suit, is found strangled to death on a popular Sussex beach. When she is finally identified, it turns out she was a top profiler for the National Crime Faculty, who was working on the case of a serial killer. And though she was a Bath resident, the authorities don't want Detective Superintendent Peter Diamond to investigate the murder. How strange. What could they be trying to hide?

Truce

Truce

Georgia Manifold leaves a family home over - flowing with love, with books and politics, poetry and music, and passionate outspoken argument. It is a life dominated by a father whom she resembles, and a mother who understands her too well. From this inheritance, Georgia sets out to make her own life. The sudden death of her father draws her home again, away from the security of an understanding lover and into a destructive affair. Consumed by the seductiveness of sexual love, Georgia's life is thrown off balance. Johanna Murray - Smith, an acclaimed playwright and screenwriter, has written a stunning debut novel.

Against the megamachine

essays on empire and its enemies

Against the megamachine

The green world in which we evolved is being shredded by our instruments and our way of life. David Watsons wide-ranging essayspublished in Fifth Estate, one of North Americas most original radical journalsponder such themes as the state, empire and war; humanitys tragic relation to the natural world; and the contemporary mass society generated by industrial capitalism and modern technology. His impassioned critique offers a vision of social transformation open to diverse possibilities, and suggests where a new politics must begin: as a radical challenge to the mystique of progress, in defense of nature, memory and spirit.

The Yard

The Yard

An autobiographical account of a young boy working in the shipyards of Belfast in the 20th century.