Everybody Loves Our Town

A History of Grunge

Everybody Loves Our Town

Grunge, also known as the 'Seattle sound', is the sludgy fusion of punk rock and heavy metal that emerged from the Pacific Northwest in the early part of the 1980s. But it was the unexpected, seemingly overnight success of Nirvana's single 'Smells Like Teen Spirit,' in the fall of 1991, that made grunge a household word and launched an American music movement on par with punk and hip-hop. Twenty years later, Mark Yarm captures that era in the words of those at the forefront of the movement (and the music's lesser-known champions). Everybody Loves Our Town will tell the whole story: the founding of originators like Soundgarden and the Melvins, the early successes of Seattle's Sub Pop record label, the rise of powerhouses Nirvana and Pearl Jam, the insane media hype surrounding the grunge explosion, the suicide of Kurt Cobain, and finally, the genre's mid-to-late-'90s decline.

Kurt Cobain and Nirvana

The Complete Illustrated History

Kurt Cobain and Nirvana

Nirvana, the immortal grunge Rock and Roll Hall of Fame inductee, is as relevant and influential as ever. Kurt Cobain, Dave Grohl, and Krist Novoselic comprised Nirvana, the band that unintentionally tore the music world asunder with the 1991 album Nevermind. The record that includes hits such as "Smells like Teen Spirit," "Come as You Are," and "Lithium" continues to rattle speakers with grunge that truly rocks. Kurt Cobain and Nirvana, Updated Edition tells the fully illustrated story of the band that spoke for Generation X in the '90s. Here we are, a quarter century after Nirvana irrevocably changed rock and roll, and the band continues to make headlines and influence music lovers. A documentary about the band and Cobain's solo album Montage of Heck: The Home Recordings were released last year, demanding a closer look at one of rock and roll's geniuses. Kurt Cobain and Nirvana reveals the band's history with fresh eyes, telling the story of a group that instigated a return to punk-inspired rock. This updated edition of the first-ever complete illustrated history of Nirvana features the writing of a sparkling team of grunge-rock experts and word slingers. The book also includes performance and backstage photography, as well as handbills, singles, ticket stubs, gig posters, and other memorabilia that complement the narrative. You'll also find album reviews, gear breakdowns, and mini synopses of Cobain's fifty all-time favorite albums. Nirvana's ride was a wild one - and all too brief.

Nuevos Pecados

Nuevos Pecados

David Byrne, ex-Talking Heads front-man and multi-talented artist, presents a brilliant and very funny updating of the Seven Deadly Sins. In a beautifully-packaged little book that is the size and shape of a portable Bible, Byrne mischievously updates the biblical notions of sin for a contemporary readership, so elucidating los nuevos pecados - 'the new sins'. Amongst his shortlist, Byrne controversially includes Hope, Generosity, Altruism, Cleanliness and Contentment. His writing is witty and engaging, full of shrewd perceptions into the ways we fool ourselves about the rectitude of our motives in life. The book is designed by Dave Eggers, author of the bestseller A Heartbreaking Work of Staggering Genius, whose contribution underlines the playful quality of this delightful and highly desirable tome.

Sells like Teen Spirit

Music, Youth Culture, and Social Crisis

Sells like Teen Spirit

Music has always been central to the cultures that young people create, follow, and embrace. In the 1960s, young hippie kids sang along about peace with the likes of Bob Dylan and Joan Baez and tried to change the world. In the 1970s, many young people ended up coming home in body bags from Vietnam, and the music scene changed, embracing punk and bands like The Sex Pistols. In Sells Like Teen Spirit, Ryan Moore tells the story of how music and youth culture have changed along with the economic, political, and cultural transformations of American society in the last four decades. By attending concerts, hanging out in dance clubs and after-hour bars, and examining the do-it-yourself music scene, Moore gives a riveting, first-hand account of the sights, sounds, and smells of “teen spirit.” Moore traces the histories of punk, hardcore, heavy metal, glam, thrash, alternative rock, grunge, and riot grrrl music, and relates them to wider social changes that have taken place. Alongside the thirty images of concert photos, zines, flyers, and album covers in the book, Moore offers original interpretations of the music of a wide range of bands including Black Sabbath, Black Flag, Metallica, Nirvana, and Sleater-Kinney. Written in a lively, engaging, and witty style, Sells Like Teen Spirit suggests a more hopeful attitude about the ways that music can be used as a counter to an overly commercialized culture, showcasing recent musical innovations by youth that emphasize democratic participation and creative self-expression—even at the cost of potential copyright infringement.

Mudhoney

The Sound and the Fury from Seattle

Mudhoney

DIVMudhoney: The Sound and the Fury from Seattle is the first-ever history of Mudhoney, the four-man Seattle band that invented grunge, written with the band’s full cooperation./div

Pearl Jam FAQ

All That's Left to Know About Seattle's Most Enduring Band

Pearl Jam FAQ

PEARL JAM FAQ: ALL THAT'S LEFT TO KNOW ABOUT SEATTLE'S MOST ENDURING BAND

Sound Tracks

Popular Music Identity and Place

Sound Tracks

Sound Tracks is the first comprehensive book on the new geography of popular music, examining the complex links between places, music and cultural identities. It provides an interdisciplinary perspective on local, national and global scenes, from the 'Mersey' and 'Icelandic' sounds to 'world music', and explores the diverse meanings of music in a range of regional contexts. In a world of intensified globalisation, links between space, music and identity are increasingly tenuous, yet places give credibility to music, not least in the 'country', and music is commonly linked to place, as a stake to originality, a claim to tradition and as a marketing device. This book develops new perspectives on these relationships and how they are situated within cultural and geographical thought.

Nirvana

The Complete Illustrated History

Nirvana

Nirvana formed in 1987, released their first LP in 1989, and unintentionally tore the music world asunder two years later with the video and single for "Smells Like Teen Spirit." At the time, MTV and rock 'n' roll in general were largely dominated by vapid hair metal acts. Nirvana, with their thrift-store clothes and pawnshop guitars, represented a much-needed return to punk-inspired rock and at the same time validated the indie rock scene that had failed to breach the mainstream in the previous decade. A meteoric rise followed, attended by all of the predictable professional and personal pitfalls. Two and half years after the release of "Teen Spirit," leader Kurt Cobain, age 27, killed himself and the ride was over. Today, Nirvana and Cobain transcend generations, not unlike Jimi Hendrix, Jim Morrison, and other artists who met premature ends. The band's story and music fascinate kids whose parents were among Nirvana's early fans. Coinciding with the twentieth anniversary of their final LP, Nirvana: The Complete Illustrated History is the first to treat fans to a stylishly designed illustrated biography of the band. Performance and off-stage photography, handbills, singles, backstage passes, gig posters, and other memorabilia complement a narrative detailing the band's tumultuous history, as well as sidebar album reviews, gear breakdowns, and mini synopses of Cobain's 50 all-time favorite albums. Nirvana's ride was a wild one--and all too brief. Here, finally, is the book that breaks that history down and presents it from an objective perspective.

I Live Inside

Memoirs of a Babe in Toyland

I Live Inside

Babes in Toyland burst onto the Minneapolis music scene in the late 1980s and quickly established itself at the forefront of punk/alternative rock. The all-female trio featured a shy, seventeen-year-old Jewish teen from the suburbs on bass guitar—an instrument she had never played before joining the band. Over the next few years, Michelle Leon lived the rock-and-roll lifestyle—playing live concerts, recording in studios, touring across the United States and Europe, and spending endless hours in stuffy vans, staying in two-star motels, and sleeping on strangers’ couches in town after town. The grind and drama of life in the band gradually wore on Leon, however, and a heartbreaking tragedy led her to rethink her commitment to the band and the music scene. Leon’s sensitive, sensory prose puts readers right on stage with Babes in Toyland while also conveying the uncertainty, vulnerability, and courage needed by a girl who never felt like she fit in to somehow find her place in the world. “A crucial and compelling account of what it was to be a woman making music in the nineties. . . . Fantastic and ferocious.”—Jessica Hopper, music and culture critic and author of The First Collection of Criticism by a Living Female Rock Critic “Profound, poetic, badass, tender, and inspiring.”—Will Hermes, author of Love Goes to Buildings on Fire “I Live Inside feels as real and personal as reading your own memories. . . . Parts read like a fairy tale while others are so haunting they will never leave you.”—Kelli Mayo, musician (Skating Polly) “Leon draws you right into the Babes in Toyland van, shows you the after party tensions and what is in the mind of this particular girl in a band.”—Darcey Steinke, author of Sister Golden Hair: A Novel and others “[Leon’s] prose is stunning, her eye is wry, and her heart enormous; the result is a compelling memoir filled with pop culture, travel, intrigue, and a young artist’s quest to find her voice.”—Laurie Lindeen, musician (Zuzu’s Petals) and author of Petal Pusher: A Rock and Roll Cinderella Story “By the end of this lyrical, tough, and moving memoir, you’ll not only feel like you know Michelle Leon, you’ll also want to talk and dance and listen to music with her.”—Scott Heim, author of Mysterious Skin and We Disappear “A vivid, poetic memoir.”—Mark Yarm, author of Everybody Loves Our Town: An Oral History of Grunge “This is Planet Leon.”—David Markey, filmmaker, author, and musician