Gift of the Red Bird

The Story of a Divine Encounter

Gift of the Red Bird

When Paula D'Arcy lost her husband and baby in a car crash, she began an inner search for a faith that was stronger than fear. In Gift of the Red Bird she shares her remarkable spiritual adventure.

The Gift of Birds

True Encounters with Avian Spirits

The Gift of Birds

An anthology of essays and short stories exploring the ways birds enrich our lives from contributors such as Kenn Kaufman, Peter Dunne, Alice Walker, and Louise Eldrich

Surviving and Thriving with Bipolar Disorder: Tips from a Survivor

Surviving and Thriving with Bipolar Disorder: Tips from a Survivor

This self-help book describes how I’ve managed to survive and thrive with bipolar disorder for over 30 years. It offers tips on how to pick a good psychiatrist, how to handle depression, anxiety and insomnia, and how to help a loved one who’s going through a manic episode. It shares with you the lessons I've learned, sometimes the hard way, over the years and also explores the “good crazy” side of being bipolar--and yes, there are some good sides, believe it or not. Many with this disorder are good artists, writers, and musicians. Many are also well-organized and have good sex lives. As the best psychiatrist I ever had told me, “You’re lucky. You’re in good company.” It’s all up to you--the person who has bipolar disorder--to decide if you’re lucky or not. To decide if your glass is half-full or half-empty. I sincerely hope my book will help you and your loved ones. It has received Five and Four Star Reviews.

Gift of the Past

Gift of the Past

Poems and Stories written by my Grandparents, Webster and Maggie Baker during the 1880s brings that part of History to life. Maggie was 18 and Webster 23 when Websters dad moved his family to Kansas to Homestead. Webster had to leave his girl friend back in Indiana. That is the heart ache behind the poem Separation. How he came back and married his formal sweetheart is part of the story. My dad, Chester Baker, grew up on this Sugar Maple farm and he had many adventures as a farm boy in the early Nineteen Hundreds. How he lost his pig down a sink hole and was able to retrieve it is part of history. Many of the stories of Mitchell were written by Jack Colglazier. My life as an airplane pilot brings history to the modern day. I was able to fl y my plane from the Pacific to the Atlantic, from Alaska to Florida and many places in between. My experience of racing airplanes is unique and very different from the normal way of life.

Keepers of Life

Discovering Plants Through Native American Stories and Earth Activities for Children

Keepers of Life

Using Native American stories as a teaching tool to help children discover plants and their environment, a complete program of study in botany, plant ecology, and natural history of many North American plants focuses on environmental and stewardship issues. IP.

The Gift of birds

featherwork of native South American peoples

The Gift of birds

Presenting 10 essays by experts in the fields of anthropology, ethnography, and ornithology on the native peoples of South America and their use of birds, this volume offers a fascinating view into the lives and customs of some of the indigenous peoples living in the rainforest and coastal areas of Brazil and Peru. This book includes color photographs of South American natives in festival and ritual celebrations and everyday activities, along with spectacular objects of featherwork, textiles, and pottery. University Museum Monograph 75

The Gift of Misfortune

The Gift of Misfortune

Summary T HE GIFT OF MISFORTUNE CHRONICLES THE STORY OF A YOUNG HAITIAN IMMIGRANT TORN BETWEEN HIS NATIVE LAND, WHICH HE LOVES UNCONDITIONALLY, AND AN ADOPTED COUNTRY THAT HE FALLS IN LOVE WITH AT FIRST SIGHT. However, once he reluctantly arrives in his new country, in spite of himself, he loves it, but three major obstacles surface that alter his attitudes and eventually his life: his natural kinship with the Christian notion of poverty and wealth; his encounter with his adopted father/friend, Thomas, who is very critical of America; and the most important, the obstacle that makes him change his attitude about American culture and democracy his malevolent and greedy wife, Monica. Politics, religion, fear, deception, greed, courage, and revelation all come to play in the journey of Armand, who brings a willing sister to the United States while his heart and soul is still in Haiti. During Haiti's most turbulent recent times, Armand and sister, Deborah, become concerned about the chaos that is claiming the streets of Port-au-Prince. The fear, violence, murder, and hopelessness were affecting not only the poor and desperate but the wealthy and desperate as well. Deborah wants to go, and so one morning, she wakes up in her comfortable house. After hearing another story of one of her friends put to death because they will not join the military of Baby Doc (Jean-Claude Duvalier), she wants to go out of Haiti as both patriot and citizen. Deborah cannot go anywhere without her brother, Armand, and though he too is frightened, he feels that he can't leave Haiti. They are not involved in politics, but are religious: Armand, fundamentalist Protestant; and Deborah, traditional Catholic. They are still thrust into the politics of the country. They attend the finest school in Haiti, and they attend this school with the country's elite who are pro-Duvalier. With warring factions, violence spurting all around them, certain friends disappearing overnight, never to return, and some friends demanding them to choose between their neutral political life, and the need for them to get involved in the Duvalier government, and concerns for Deborah's freedom since an important Duvalier official might want Deborah for his son, they hatch a plan to escape to the United States of America. In the beginning, it is Deborah, and not Armand, who wanted to abandon Haiti, but Armand has to go to protect his sister and make sure she got there safely. After making a careful trip to Bainet to get money from their very wealthy parents, they leave for the United States of America. Armand leaves with a heavy heart because, unlike Deborah, he wanted to stay in Haiti to do religious work, which would end up looking like political work since Armand has a close connection and passion for the poor. But because of family and tradition, Deborah becomes the major priority. Armand starts a whole new journey when he gets on that plane to the United States and lands in New York City, where his relatives and friends are awaiting him and Deborah. In New York City, he is immediately thrown into a quandary. Though he misses Haiti, he excitingly falls in love with the United States and New York City. On his beginning U.S. journey, he is introduced to the two most important people in his life and the two most important characters in the novel. Also, he is introduced to two of the most important persons he met in his life in the United States: Thomas, a radical Christian socialist who constantly places the United States into the glaring light of expectation and reality and compels Armand to go beyond his strict religious beliefs to uncover deeper truth about a society that worships the material greed; and the other person is Monica, a young woman of questionable reputation, but has sterling charm, a charm that, in spite of all of the warning of Armand's family and church friends, got Armand to marry her. The novel unfolds with these two polar, opposite ch

The Gift of the Face

Portraiture and Time in Edward S. Curtis's The North American Indian

The Gift of the Face

Edward S. Curtis's The North American Indian is the most ambitious photographic and ethnographic record of Native American cultures ever produced. Published between 1907 and 1930 as a series of twenty volumes and portfolios, the work contains more than two thousand photographs intended to document the traditional culture of every Native American tribe west of the Mississippi. Many critics have claimed that Curtis's images present Native peoples as a "vanishing race," hiding both their engagement with modernity and the history of colonial violence. But in this major reappraisal of Curtis's work, Shamoon Zamir argues instead that Curtis's photography engages meaningfully with the crisis of culture and selfhood brought on by the dramatic transformations of Native societies. This crisis is captured profoundly, and with remarkable empathy, in Curtis's images of the human face. Zamir also contends that we can fully understand this achievement only if we think of Curtis's Native subjects as coauthors of his project. This radical reassessment is presented as a series of close readings that explore the relationship of aesthetics and ethics in photography. Zamir's richly illustrated study resituates Curtis's work in Native American studies and in the histories of photography and visual anthropology.

The Most Magical Gift of All

The Most Magical Gift of All

Dr. Jack Armitage can't wait to spend the Christmas holidays on a beach sipping cocktails. But his much-deserved vacation is delayed when an unexpected gift is left on his doorstep...a little girl! Reformed bad boy Jack is great with kids, but only when they're his patients. Dr. Sophie Norman is Jack's temporary replacement, but this single gal didn't expect her new duties to involve being a stand-in mom! Jack needs all the help that Sophie can give him. While doing their best to ensure this little girl has a magical Christmas, they find the most magical gift of all—a family.