Greek Tragedy on the American Stage

Ancient Drama in the Commercial Theater, 1882-1994

Greek Tragedy on the American Stage

This assemblage of the performance history of Greek tragedies produced on the American commercial stage with accompanying critics' comments reflects the changes in the social and political climate in each decade of the last century.

Greek Tragedy

Greek Tragedy

H.D.F Kitto's acclaimed study of Greek tragedy, first published in 1936 is now available for the first time in Routledge Classics. This edition includes a new foreword by Edith Hall.

Greek Tragedy

Greek Tragedy

A 1911 account of the origins and characteristics of Greek tragedies, discussing the works of Aeschylus, Sophocles and Euripides.

Greek Tragedy on the Move

The Birth of a Panhellenic Art Form c. 500-300 BC

Greek Tragedy on the Move

Greek tragedy is one of the most important cultural legacies of the classical world, with a rich and varied history and reception, yet it appears to have its roots in a very particular place and time. The authors of the surviving works of Greek tragic drama-Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides-were all from one city, Athens, and all lived in the fifth century BC; unsurprisingly, it has often been supposed that tragic drama was inherently linked in some way to fifth-century Athens and its democracy. Why then do we refer to tragedy as 'Greek', rather than 'Attic' or 'Athenian', as some scholars have argued? This volume argues that the story of tragedy's development and dissemination is inherently one of travel and that tragedy grew out of, and became part of, a common Greek culture, rather than being explicitly Athenian. Although Athens was a major panhellenic centre, by the fifth century a well-established network of festivals and patrons had grown up to encompass Greek cities and sanctuaries from Sicily to Asia Minor and from North Africa to the Black Sea. The movement of professional poets, actors, and audience members along this circuit allowed for the exchange of poetry in general and tragedy in particular, which came to be performed all over the Greek world and was therefore a panhellenic phenomenon even from the time of the earliest performances. The stories that were dramatized were themselves tales of travel-the epic journeys of heroes such as Heracles, Jason, or Orestes- and the works of the tragedians not only demonstrated how the various peoples of Greece were connected through the wanderings of their ancestors, but also how these connections could be sustained by travelling poets and their acts of retelling.

Greek Tragedy

Themes and Contexts

Greek Tragedy

The latest volume in the Classical World series, this book offers a much-needed up-to-date introduction to Greek tragedy, and covers the most important thematic topics studied at school or university level. After a brief analysis of the genre and main figures, it focuses on the broader questions of what defines tragedy, what its particular preoccupations are, and what makes these texts so widely studied and performed more than 2,000 years after they were written. As such, the book will be of interest to students taking broad courses on Greek tragedy, while also being suitable for the general reader who wants an overview of the subject. All passages of tragedy discussed are translated by the author and supplementary information includes a chronology of all the surviving tragedies, a glossary, and guidance on further reading.

Greek Tragedy

Greek Tragedy

Agememnon is the first part of the Aeschylus's Orestian trilogy in which the leader of the Greek army returns from the Trojan war to be murdered by his treacherous wife Clytemnestra. In Sophocles' Oedipus Rex the king sets out to uncover the cause of the plague that has struck his city, only to disover the devastating truth about his relationship with his mother and his father. Medea is the terrible story of a woman's bloody revenge on her adulterous husband through the murder of her own children.

Achilles in Greek Tragedy

Achilles in Greek Tragedy

Examines how the tragic dramatists persistently appropriated Achilles to address the concerns of their time.

Greek tragedy

Greek tragedy

This volume, the second in the series Greece and Rome Studies, collects together seventeen articles on Greek tragedy published between 1972 and 1989 in the journal Greece and Rome. Greek tragedy remains a subject of central concern, not only in classics, English, and world literature courses at school and university, but also in the live theatre, where new translations of the plays of Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides continue to play to capacity audiences. The articles in this volume, by leading authorities in the field, include treatments of individual plays by all three playwrights, studies of character and imagery, and, to begin with, an examination of recent critical assumptions. Those studying Greek tragedy either in Greek or in translation willfind their interests well represented.

A Companion to Greek Tragedy

A Companion to Greek Tragedy

The Blackwell Companion to Greek Tragedy provides readers with a fundamental grounding in Greek tragedy, and also introduces them to the various methodologies and the lively critical dialogue that characterize the study of Greek tragedy today. Comprises 31 original essays by an international cast of contributors, including up-and-coming as well as distinguished senior scholars Pays attention to socio-political, textual, and performance aspects of Greek tragedy All ancient Greek is transliterated and translated, and technical terms are explained as they appear Includes suggestions for further reading at the end of each chapter, and a generous and informative combined bibliography

An Introduction to Greek Tragedy

An Introduction to Greek Tragedy

This book provides an accessible introduction for students and anyone interested in increasing their enjoyment of Greek tragic plays. Whether readers are studying Greek culture, performing a Greek tragedy, or simply interested in reading a Greek play, this book will help them to understand and enjoy this challenging and rewarding genre. An Introduction to Greek Tragedy provides background information, helps readers appreciate, enjoy and engage with the plays themselves, and gives them an idea of the important questions in current scholarship on tragedy. Ruth Scodel seeks to dispel misleading assumptions about tragedy, stressing how open the plays are to different interpretations and reactions. In addition to general background, the book also includes chapters on specific plays, both the most familiar titles and some lesser-known plays - Persians, Helen and Orestes - in order to convey the variety that the tragedies offer readers.