Love and Sex with Robots

The Evolution of Human-Robot Relationships

Love and Sex with Robots

Love, marriage, and sex with robots? Not in a million years? Maybe a whole lot sooner! A leading expert in artificial intelligence, David Levy argues that the entities we once deemed cold and mechanical will soon become the objects of real companionship and human desire. He shows how automata have evolved and how human interactions with technology have changed over the years. Levy explores many aspects of human relationships—the reasons we fall in love, why we form emotional attachments to animals and virtual pets, and why these same attachments could extend to love for robots. Levy also examines how society's ideas about what constitutes normal sex have changed—and will continue to change—as sexual technology becomes increasingly sophisticated. Shocking, eye-opening, provocative, and utterly convincing, Love and Sex with Robots is compelling reading for anyone with an open mind.

Love and Sex with Robots

Third International Conference, LSR 2017, London, UK, December 19-20, 2017, Revised Selected Papers

Love and Sex with Robots

This book constitutes the refereed proceedings of the Third International Conference on Love and Sex with Robots, LSR 2017, held in December 2017, in London, UK. The 12 revised papers presented together with 2 keynotes were carefully reviewed and selected from a total of 83 submissions. One of the biggest challenges of the Love and Sex with Robots conference is to engage a wider scientific community in the discussions of the multifaceted topic, which has only recently established itself as an academic research topic within, but not limited to, the disciplines of artificial intelligence, human-computer interaction, robotics, biomedical science and robot ethics etc.

What's Next in Love and Sex

Psychological and Cultural Perspectives

What's Next in Love and Sex

What's Next in Love and Sex is a comprehensive examination of contemporary academic findings relating to all matters of the mind, body, and heart. Inspired by questions asked by students, the book covers cutting-edge topics so new that they are rarely addressed in current sexuality texts, providing insight into modern trends such as hookup culture, virtual pornography, robots, apps, and online dating as they evolve in this day and age. Written by one of the pioneers of love and sex research, Elaine Hatfield, along with historian Richard Rapson and social psychologist Jeannette Purvis, this book uses contemporary scientific findings to provide an updated and relevant explanation for why we do the things we do when we're in love, searching for love, making love, or trying to keep a faltering relationship together. Combining rigorous scholarship with an accessible and entertaining style, no other book will give college students and academics alike such a developed understanding of contemporary love and sex.

Human–Robot Intimate Relationships

Human–Robot Intimate Relationships

The idea of humans falling in love with artificial beings is not a modern conception. Our relationship with artificial partners has come a long way since Pygmalion and his ivory lover. In recent years, there has been a strong upsurge of interest and discussions in the various aspects of intimate relationships between humans and artificial partners. This interest is evidenced by the increase in media coverage, TV documentaries and films on this topic, as well as the active research efforts within the academic community. This book provides a comprehensive collection and overview of the latest development in the field of intimate relationships between humans and artificial partners, in particular robots and virtual agents. It includes relevant research work undertaken by the authors, the latest advancements in technology and commercial products, and future predictions and insights from leading experts in the area. This book contains an in-depth discussion of the engineering, philosophical, psychological, ethical, and sociological implications of relationships with artificial companions. It also gives a glimpse of some future directions of artificial intelligence, human-computer love and sexual interaction, robotics engineering etc. It is a great resource for researchers and professionals working in these areas. The narrative style of the book also makes it an enjoyable and educational read for everyone.

Robot Sex

Social and Ethical Implications

Robot Sex

Perspectives from philosophy, psychology religious studies, economics, and law on the possible future of robot-human sexual relationships. Sexbots are coming. Given the pace of technological advances, it is inevitable that realistic robots specifically designed for people's sexual gratification will be developed in the not-too-distant future. Despite popular culture's fascination with the topic, and the emergence of the much-publicized Campaign Against Sex Robots, there has been little academic research on the social, philosophical, moral, and legal implications of robot sex. This book fills the gap, offering perspectives from philosophy, psychology, religious studies, economics, and law on the possible future of robot-human sexual relationships. Contributors discuss what a sex robot is, if they exist, why we should take the issue seriously, and what it means to “have sex” with a robot. They make the case for developing sex robots, arguing for their beneficial nature, and the case against it, on religious and moral grounds; they consider the subject from the robot's perspective, addressing such issues as consent and agency; and they ask whether it is possible for a human to form a mutually satisfying, loving relationship with a robot. Finally, they speculate about the future of human-robot sexual interaction, considering the social acceptability of sex robots and the possible effect on society. Contributors Marina Adshade, Thomas Arnold, Julie Carpenter, John Danaher, Brian Earp, Lily Eva Frank, Joshua Goldstein, Michael Hauskeller, Noreen Herzfeld, Neil McArthur, Mark Migotti, Sven Nyholm, Ezio di Nucci, Steve Petersen, Anders Sandberg, Matthias Scheutz, Litska Strikwerda, Nicole Wyatt

Pflegeroboter

Pflegeroboter

Dieses Open-Access-Buch bündelt technische, wirtschaftliche, medizinische und ethische Reflexionen über Pflegeroboter. Pflegeroboter, im Moment noch mehrheitlich Prototypen, unterstützen oder ersetzen menschliche Pflegekräfte bzw. Betreuer. Sie bringen Kranken und Alten die benötigten Medikamente und Nahrungsmittel, helfen beim Hinlegen und Aufrichten oder alarmieren den Notdienst. Vorteile von Pflegerobotern sind durchgehende Verwendbarkeit und gleichbleibende Qualität der Dienstleistung. Nachteile sind Kostenintensität (bei möglicher Amortisation) und Komplexität der Anforderungen. Unter der wissenschaftlichen Leitung von Prof. Dr. Oliver Bendel trafen sich im September 2017 Vertreter verschiedener wissenschaftlicher Disziplinen im Rahmen eines Ladenburger Diskurses der Daimler und Benz Stiftung, um über den aktuellen und künftigen Einsatz von Pflegerobotern zu sprechen und Forschungspotenziale zu identifizieren. Die Autoren gehen in ihren Beiträgen auch Fragen aus Wirtschafts-, Medizin- und Informationsethik nach: Wer trägt die Verantwortung bei einer fehlerhaften Betreuung und Versorgung durch die Maschine? Inwieweit kann diese die persönliche und informationelle Autonomie des Patienten unterstützen oder gefährden? Ist der Roboter eine Entlastung oder ein Konkurrent für Pflegekräfte? Antworten müssen von Wissenschaft und Gesellschaft gefunden werden.

Close Engagements with Artificial Companions

Key Social, Psychological, Ethical and Design Issues

Close Engagements with Artificial Companions

What will it be like to admit Artificial Companions into our society? How will they change our relations with each other? How important will they be in the emotional and practical lives of their owners since we know that people became emotionally dependent even on simple devices like the Tamagotchi? How much social life might they have in contacting each other? The contributors to this book discuss the possibility and desirability of some form of long-term computer Companions now being a certainty in the coming years. It is a good moment to consider, from a set of wide interdisciplinary perspectives, both how we shall construct them technically as well as their personal philosophical and social consequences. By Companions we mean conversationalists or confidants not robots but rather computer software agents whose function will be to get to know their owners over a long period. Those may well be elderly or lonely, and the contributions in the book focus not only on assistance via the internet (contacts, travel, doctors etc.) but also on providing company and Companionship, by offering aspects of real personalization."

The Laws of Robots

Crimes, Contracts, and Torts

The Laws of Robots

This book explores how the design, construction, and use of robotics technology may affect today’s legal systems and, more particularly, matters of responsibility and agency in criminal law, contractual obligations, and torts. By distinguishing between the behaviour of robots as tools of human interaction, and robots as proper agents in the legal arena, jurists will have to address a new generation of “hard cases.” General disagreement may concern immunity in criminal law (e.g., the employment of robot soldiers in battle), personal accountability for certain robots in contracts (e.g., robo-traders), much as clauses of strict liability and negligence-based responsibility in extra-contractual obligations (e.g., service robots in tort law). Since robots are here to stay, the aim of the law should be to wisely govern our mutual relationships.

Moral Machines

Teaching Robots Right from Wrong

Moral Machines

Computers are already approving financial transactions, controlling electrical supplies, and driving trains. Soon, service robots will be taking care of the elderly in their homes, and military robots will have their own targeting and firing protocols. Colin Allen and Wendell Wallach argue that as robots take on more and more responsibility, they must be programmed with moral decision-making abilities, for our own safety. Taking a fast paced tour through the latest thinking about philosophical ethics and artificial intelligence, the authors argue that even if full moral agency for machines is a long way off, it is already necessary to start building a kind of functional morality, in which artificial moral agents have some basic ethical sensitivity. But the standard ethical theories don't seem adequate, and more socially engaged and engaging robots will be needed. As the authors show, the quest to build machines that are capable of telling right from wrong has begun. Moral Machines is the first book to examine the challenge of building artificial moral agents, probing deeply into the nature of human decision making and ethics.