Not One More Death

Not One More Death

Prominent musicians, playwrights, scientists, and writers look at how public opinion is willfully ignored, and "democracy" used as a figleaf for U.S. imperial ambitions in the Middle East.

Women Mobilizing Memory

Women Mobilizing Memory

Women Mobilizing Memory, a transnational exploration of the intersection of feminism, history, and memory, shows how the recollection of violent histories can generate possibilities for progressive futures. Questioning the politics of memory-making in relation to experiences of vulnerability and violence, this wide-ranging collection asks: How can memories of violence and its afterlives be mobilized for change? What strategies can disrupt and counter public forgetting? What role do the arts play in addressing the erasure of past violence from current memory and in creating new visions for future generations? Women Mobilizing Memory emerges from a multiyear feminist collaboration bringing together an interdisciplinary group of scholars, artists, and activists from Chile, Turkey, and the United States. The essays in this book assemble and discuss a deep archive of works that activate memory across a variety of protest cultures, ranging from seemingly minor acts of defiance to broader resistance movements. The memory practices it highlights constitute acts of repair that demand justice but do not aim at restitution. They invite the creation of alternative histories that can reconfigure painful pasts and presents. Giving voice to silenced memories and reclaiming collective memories that have been misrepresented in official narratives, Women Mobilizing Memory offers an alternative to more monumental commemorative practices. It models a new direction for memory studies and testifies to a continuing hope for an alternative future.

Death in Henry James

Death in Henry James

Moving beyond established ideas of haunted Henry James, this book argues that death is as important a concept for understanding James's fiction as gender, sexuality and modernity, which have come to dominate James studies. Combining formal analysis and close reading with theoretical and historical approaches and focusing on key novels and tales from across James's career, Andrew Cutting explores five instances of Jamesian death: sacrifice, the corpse, morbidity, afterlife and demography. This is the first full-length study of this subject.

Seeking Rights from the Left

Gender, Sexuality, and the Latin American Pink Tide

Seeking Rights from the Left

Seeking Rights from the Left offers a unique comparative assessment of left-leaning Latin American governments by examining their engagement with feminist, women's, and LGBT movements and issues. Focusing on the “Pink Tide” in eight national cases—Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Ecuador, Nicaragua, Uruguay, and Venezuela—the contributors evaluate how the Left addressed gender- and sexuality-based rights through the state. Most of these governments improved the basic conditions of poor women and their families. Many significantly advanced women's representation in national legislatures. Some legalized same-sex relationships and enabled their citizens to claim their own gender identity. They also opened opportunities for feminist and LGBT movements to press forward their demands. But at the same time, these governments have largely relied on heteropatriarchal relations of power, ignoring or rejecting the more challenging elements of a social agenda and engaging in strategic trade-offs among gender and sexual rights. Moreover, the comparative examination of such rights arenas reveals that the Left's more general political and economic projects have been profoundly, if at times unintentionally, informed by traditional understandings of gender and sexuality. Contributors: Sonia E. Alvarez, María Constanza Diaz, Rachel Elfenbein, Elisabeth Jay Friedman, Niki Johnson, Victoria Keller, Edurne Larracoechea Bohigas, Amy Lind, Marlise Matos, Shawnna Mullenax, Ana Laura Rodríguez Gustá, Diego Sempol, Constanza Tabbush, Gwynn Thomas, Catalina Trebisacce, Annie Wilkinson

Of Better Blood

Of Better Blood

Teenage polio survivor Rowan Collier is caught in the crossfire of a secret war against "the unfit." It's 1922, and eugenics—the movement dedicated to racial purity and good breeding—has taken hold in America. State laws allow institutions to sterilize minorities, the "feeble-minded," and the poor, while local eugenics councils set up exhibits at county fairs with "fitter family" contests and propaganda. After years of being confined to hospitals, Rowan is recruited at sixteen to play a born cripple in a county fair eugenics exhibit. But gutsy, outspoken Dorchy befriends Rowan and helps her realize her own inner strength and bravery. The two escape the fair and end up at a summer camp on a desolate island run by the New England Eugenics Council. There they discover something is happening to the children. Rowan must find a way to stop the horrors on the island...if she can escape them herself.

The Author

The Author

Winner of the 2010 Whiting Award for best new play. Winner of the 2010 Total Theatre Award for Innovation. Nominated in the Evening Standard Theatre Awards 2010. Settle back into the warmth of the theatre. Relax as the story unfolds. For you. With you. Of you. A story of hope, violence and exploitation. Laugh with the actors, tap your feet to the music, turn to your neighbour. You’re here. The Author tells the story of another play: a violent, shocking and abusive play written by a playwright called Tim Crouch and performed at the Royal Court Theatre. It charts the effect that play had on the two actors who acted in it and an audience member who watched it. The Author explores our responsibilities to what we choose to look at in the world and how we choose to act accordingly. Performed within its audience, it is a brilliantly inventive and theatrical study of what we deem acceptable in the name of Art. ‘A bold, brave, playful piece, a devastating riff on ways of seeing and turning a blind eye to our own moral choices 4 stars... a dazzling theatrical experience that lets nobody off the hook’ - Lyn Gardner, The Guardian ‘At once sharply satirical and coolly thought-provoking. 4 stars’ - Dominic Cavendish, The Telegraph ‘The Author is by turns funny, twee, exciting, unnerving and dull, and I don’t think I’ll ever forget it.’ The Times ‘The writing is subtly brilliant, the sense of moral responsibility and exploration even greater. And because of its unusual form, it doesn’t let the audience off the hook either.’ The Scotsman

Women, Wisdom, and Witness

Engaging contexts in Conversation

Women, Wisdom, and Witness

The New Voices Seminar is a lively, intergenerational, and diverse group of women scholars who take an interdisciplinary approach to the study of Christianity. Under the leadership of Kathleen Dolphin, the seminar gathers annually at Saint Mary's College, Notre Dame, for collegial and collaborative conversation about women in the church and in the world. With Women, Wisdom, and Witness, readers are invited to join their conversation. This collection of essays by seminar members addresses significant contexts of contemporary women's experience: suffering and resistance, education, and the crossroads of religion and public life. Theology is brought to bear on some pressing issues in our time: poverty, sexual norms, trauma and slavery, health care, immigration, and the roles of women in academia and in the church. Readers will discover the rich socio-political, interdisciplinary, and dialogical implications of Catholic women's intellectual and social praxis in contemporary theology and ethics.

War Letters

Extraordinary Correspondence from American Wars

War Letters

In 1998, Andrew Carroll founded the Legacy Project, with the goal of remembering Americans who have served their nation and preserving their letters for posterity. Since then, over 50,000 letters have poured in from around the country. Nearly two hundred of them comprise this amazing collection -- including never-before-published letters that appear in the new afterword. Here are letters from the Civil War, World War I, World War II, Korea, the Cold War, Vietnam, the Persian Gulf war, Somalia, and Bosnia -- dramatic eyewitness accounts from the front lines, poignant expressions of love for family and country, insightful reflections on the nature of warfare. Amid the voices of common soldiers, marines, airmen, sailors, nurses, journalists, spies, and chaplains are letters by such legendary figures as Gen. William T. Sherman, Clara Barton, Theodore Roosevelt, Ernie Pyle, Gen. Douglas MacArthur, Julia Child, Gen. Norman Schwarzkopf, and Gen. Benjamin O. Davis Sr. Collected in War Letters, they are an astonishing historical record, a powerful tribute to those who fought, and a celebration of the enduring power of letters.

Asterisk

Asterisk

Master of suspense Campbell Armstrong delivers a spine-tingling espionage novel about two men struggling to stop—and survive—a murderous conspiracy based in the darkest corners of the American government John Thorne lives a good life in Washington, DC, with a girlfriend he adores and a stable job at the White House. But when an old family friend, Major General Burckhardt, gives him an attaché case with a file inside labeled “the Asterisk Project,” John starts investigating. What he uncovers is a secret that could change the world—if it doesn’t kill him first.