Secrets

The CIA's War at Home

Secrets

The product of fifteen years of interviews and investigation and a lawsuit against the CIA, an expose+a7 reveals the agency's systematic efforts to suppress and censor information since the 1960s in the name of national security. UP.

Women's Secrets

A Translation of Pseudo-Albertus Magnus' De Secretis Mulierum with Commentaries

Women's Secrets

Women’s Secrets provides the first modern translation of the notorious treatise De secretis mulierum, popular throughout the late middle ages and into modern times. The Secrets deals with human reproduction and was written to instruct celibate medieval monks on the facts of life and some of the ways of the universe. However, the book had a much more far-reaching influence. Lemay shows how its message that women were evil, lascivious creatures built on the misogyny of the work’s Aristotelian sources and laid the groundwork for serious persecution of women. Both the content of the treatise and the reputation of its author (erroneously believed to be Albertus Magnus) inspired a few medieval scholars to compose lengthy commentaries on the text, substantial selections from which are included, providing further evidence of how medieval men interpreted science and viewed the female body.

Legal Secrets

Equality and Efficiency in the Common Law

Legal Secrets

Does the seller of a house have to tell the buyer that the water is turned off twelve hours a day? Does the buyer of a great quantity of tobacco have to inform the seller that the military blockade of the local port, which had depressed tobacco sales and lowered prices, is about to end? Courts say yes in the first case, no in the second. How can we understand the difference in judgments? And what does it say about whether the psychiatrist should disclose to his patient's girlfriend that the patient wants to kill her? Kim Lane Scheppele answers the question, Which secrets are legal secrets and what makes them so? She challenges the economic theory of law, which argues that judges decide cases in ways that maximize efficiency, and she shows that judges use equality as an important principle in their decisions. In the course of thinking about secrets, Scheppele also explores broader questions about judicial reasoning—how judges find meaning in legal texts and how they infuse every fact summary with the values of their legal culture. Finally, the specific insights about secrecy are shown to be consistent with a general moral theory of law that indicates what the content of law should be if the law is to be legitimate, a theory that sees legal justification as the opportunity to attract consent. This is more than a book about secrets. It is also a book about the limits of an economic view of law. Ultimately, it is a work in constructive legal theory, one that draws on moral philosophy, sociology, economics, and political theory to develop a new view of legal interpretation and legal morality.

The Psychology of Secrets

The Psychology of Secrets

The public revelation of what were once considered extremely private matters is becoming a new social norm. Has this movement toward openness gone too far? Are there negative consequences to revealing secrets? When and why is it helpful to reveal secrets? What can be done to alleviate the burden of secrecy? Will the anguish of keeping a secret pass in time? What factors should enter into deciding to reveal a secret? This book addresses these questions.

Secrets

A Novel

Secrets

“With Secrets, Nuruddin Farah solidifies his reputation as one of the world’s great writers.”—Ishmael Reed Set against the backdrop of the civil war in Somalia, this stunningly ambitious novel was a Los Angeles Times Book Review Best Fiction of the Year Selection. In Mogadiscio, the dictator is preparing to flee and clans are moving into the city, which rattles with machine gun fire. Society is collapsing under the weight of its own perversities. Unexpectedly, Kalaman, a businessman who owns a computer store, receives a visit from his childhood crush, who has returned from America to take him up on an old pledge—and have his child. The arrival of his house guest pulls Kalaman back into a past he thought he had escaped, rife with doubts and secrets that go deep into his heritage. In a dazzling display of storytelling genius, Nuruddin Farah weaves together myth and magic, shape shifters and tribal wisdom, frank sexuality and lyrical prose as Kalaman revisits his own coming of age story and finds the heartbreaking tale of his famliy’s lost innocence amid the ravages of authoritarianism. With Secrets, the culmination of his Blood in the Sun trilogy, Farah draws readers through the rifts that have torn across Somali society and into the culture and mindset of his troubled country. Skyhorse Publishing, as well as our Arcade, Yucca, and Good Books imprints, are proud to publish a broad range of books for readers interested in fiction—novels, novellas, political and medical thrillers, comedy, satire, historical fiction, romance, erotic and love stories, mystery, classic literature, folklore and mythology, literary classics including Shakespeare, Dumas, Wilde, Cather, and much more. While not every title we publish becomes a New York Times bestseller or a national bestseller, we are committed to books on subjects that are sometimes overlooked and to authors whose work might not otherwise find a home.

Secrets and Knowledge in Medicine and Science, 1500-1800

Secrets and Knowledge in Medicine and Science, 1500-1800

Secrets played a central role in transformations in medical, alchemical, natural philosophical and commercial knowledge in early modern Europe. This volume brings together international scholars from a variety of fields to offer insights and new interpretations into the role played by secrets in their area of specialization.

Science and the Secrets of Nature

Books of Secrets in Medieval and Early Modern Culture

Science and the Secrets of Nature

By explaining how to sire multicolored horses, produce nuts without shells, and create an egg the size of a human head, Giambattista Della Porta's Natural Magic (1559) conveys a fascination with tricks and illusions that makes it a work difficult for historians of science to take seriously. Yet, according to William Eamon, it is in the "how-to" books written by medieval alchemists, magicians, and artisans that modern science has its roots. These compilations of recipes on everything from parlor tricks through medical remedies to wool-dyeing fascinated medieval intellectuals because they promised access to esoteric "secrets of nature." To popular readers of the early modern era, they offered a hands-on, experimental approach to nature that made scholastic natural philosophy seem abstract and sterile. In closely examining this rich but little-known source of literature, Eamon reveals that printing technology and popular culture had as great, if not stronger, an impact on early modern science as did the traditional academic disciplines. Medieval interest in the secrets of nature was spurred in part by ancient works such as Pliny's Natural History. As medieval experimenters adapted ancient knowledge to their changing needs, they created their own books of secrets, which expressed the uncritical, empiricist approach of popular culture rather than the subtle argumentation of scholastic science. The crude experimental methodology advanced by the "professors of secrets" became for the "new philosophers" of the seventeenth century a potent ideological weapon in the challenge of natural philosophy.

Secrets of Life, Secrets of Death

Essays on Language, Gender, and Science

Secrets of Life, Secrets of Death

The essays included here represent Fox Keller's attempts to integrate the insights of feminist theory with those of her contemporaries in the history and philosophy of science.

Secrets

Secrets

Keeping a secret is the first step in becoming an individual. Telling it is the second step.