Food Security Among Small-Scale Agricultural Producers in Southern Africa

Food Security Among Small-Scale Agricultural Producers in Southern Africa

The book focuses on food security highlighting the role of indigenous knowledge and scientific research in addressing the plight of poor small-scale agricultural producers. Rapidly growing global population and global policies and management governing sustainability, hunger, food security and poverty alleviation are discussed. Additionally, impacts of probable climate change, research on land productivity and performance of dependable food crops i.e. cassava and pearl millet are discussed. Analyzed in great detail are roles of small stock, urban/peri-urban agriculture and advantages of climate-smart agriculture and participatory research in enhancing food security of the small-scale agricultural producers in Southern Africa.

Designing Urban Agriculture

A Complete Guide to the Planning, Design, Construction, Maintenance and Management of Edible Landscapes

Designing Urban Agriculture

A comprehensive overview of edible landscapes—completewith more than 300 full-color photos and illustrations Designing Urban Agriculture is about the intersection ofecology, design, and community. Showcasing projects and designersfrom around the world who are forging new paths to the sustainablecity through urban agriculture landscapes, it creates a dialogue onthe ways to invite food back into the city and pave a path tohealthier communities and environments. This full-color guide begins with a foundation of ecologicalprinciples and the idea that the food shed is part of a city'surban systems network. It outlines a design process based onsystems thinking and developed for a lifecycle orregenerative-based approach. It also presents strategies, tools,and guidelines that enable informed decisions on planning,designing, budgeting, constructing, maintaining, marketing, andincreasing the sustainability of this re-invented cityscape. Casestudies demonstrate the environmental, economic, and social valueof these landscapes and reveal paths to a greener and healthierurban environment. This unique and indispensable guide: Details how to plan, design, fund, construct, and leverage thesustainability aspects of the edible landscape typology Covers over a dozen typologies including community gardens,urban farms, edible estates, green roofs and vertical walls, edibleschool yards, seed to table, food landscapes within parks, plazas,streetscapes and green infrastructure systems and more Explains how to design regenerative edible landscapes thatbenefit both community and ecology and explores the connectionsbetween food, policy, and planning that promote viable food shedsystems for more resilient communities Examines the integration of management, maintenance, andoperations issues Reveals how to create a business model enterprise thataddresses a lifecycle approach

Urban Agriculture

Ideas and Designs for the New Food Revolution

Urban Agriculture

The new food revolution happening right where you live

Berkshire Encyclopedia of Sustainability 5/10

Ecosystem Management and Sustainability

Berkshire Encyclopedia of Sustainability 5/10

Ecosystem Management and Sustainability analyzes myriad human-initiated processes and tools developed to foster sustainable natural resource use, preservation, and restoration. It also examines how humans interact with plant, marine, and animal life in both natural and human-altered environments. Experts explain the complex ecosystem relationships that result from invasive species, roads, fencing, and even our homes by addressing topics such as fire and groundwater management, disturbance, and ecosystem resilience. Because most people in the 21st century live in urban environments, the volume pays special attention to the ecology of cities, with detailed coverage on topics ranging from urban agriculture to landscape architecture. The volume focuses on how ecosystems across the world can be restored, maintained, and used productively and sustainably.

Anything Grows!

Ingenious Ways to Grow More Food in Front Yards, Backyards, Side Yards, in the Suburbs, in the City, on Rooftops, Even Parking Lots

Anything Grows!

Ingenious ways to grow more food in front yards, backyards, side yards, in the suburbs, in the city, on rooftops, even in parking lots.

Growing Food in the Southwest Mountains (4th Edition)

A Guide to High-Altitude, Semi-arid Home Permaculture Gardens

Growing Food in the Southwest Mountains (4th Edition)

Whether you are a weekend gardener who has never heard of permaculture, or an avid gardener already familiar with the permaculture approach, this book will help you grow food under the most challenging of circumstances. Growing Food in the Southwest Mountains will teach you how to deal with dry weather, high winds, intense sunlight, cold nights, summer heat, insect pests, weeds and other challenges of the high-elevation Southwest. This 4th edition of this popular regional gardening book contains more than four times the information in the 3rd edition. The 4th edition includes: Information applicable to an expanded geographical range including the highlands of Arizona, New Mexico, Colorado, Utah, Nevada and California. An expanded list of fruit, herbs, vegetables, beans, nuts and seeds with detailed planting information on water, sun and soil needs, USDA zones, pollination requirements and more.A thorough look at how climate change is altering gardening at high elevations in the Southwest.Why we need to recreate local food systems in an era of climate change and resource depletion. An expanded description of permaculture garden design for our bioregion including a new chapter on creating plant guild ecosystems in harmony with your local wild ecosystems and wildlife. Learn how to attract native pollinators and other beneficial insects and birds to your garden while keeping out garden pests.Expanded chapters on improving local soils, rainwater harvesting, greywater reuse, xeriscaping and other efficient garden watering methods, cold climate gardening in the semi-arid Southwest, gardening in sunny, shady and windy conditions, planting windbreaks, protecting plants from hail, fireproofing your yard and gardens, dealing with garden pests and diseases in an ecological manner, choosing seeds and seedlings, detailed seedling-raising information, seed saving and more. The new final chapter contains a brief history of Southwestern gathering, horticultural, agricultural and food traditions of Native Americans and European-American settlers. The chapter ends with a peek at creating a new bioregional cuisine from these traditions and traditions from similar ecosystems around the world such as the Andes Mountains and Tibetan Plateau. Appendices include glossaries of food plants and ingredient substitutions using foods that can be grown locally, and a large resource section of books, catalogs, magazines, DVDs, arboretums and permaculture institutes. For the first time the book includes an index.Hundreds of black and white drawings. This book will be most useful to you if you live in the ponderosa pine/Jeffrey pine forests or pinyon-juniper woodlands between 6,500-8,500 feet in Arizona, New Mexico, Colorado, Utah, Nevada and California. Most of the book is also useful to gardeners living in ponderosa forests and pinyon-juniper woodlands below 6,500 feet. Most of the information is also applicable to higher-elevation aspen-spruce-fir forests. What people are saying about Growing Food in the Southwest Mountains "Lisa Rayner’s book removes much of the mystery and guesswork involved in the endeavor of growing food in these harsh and, at times, unforgiving climates. Lisa draws from her extensive background in ecology and permaculture to create a holistic approach to gardening. The book contains critical information on microclimates and soils and on selecting appropriate species and varieties that are adapted to high elevations and short growing seasons. She also incorporates helpful information on the history of growing food in the Southwest, describes guilds of species that create thriving forest gardens, and recommends appropriate times to plant your seeds and starts. The appendices, which include a list of food substitutes, a glossary of food crops, and several pages of additional resources are well worth the price of the book. I highly recommend this book for anyone in the Southwest Mountains who is serious about growing their own food." — Judith D. Springer Co-editor of Field Guide to Forest & Mountain Plants of Northern Arizona "... a remarkably thorough and carefully assembled handbook for the home gardener in these challenging environments. Handsome original line drawings by Zachary Zdinack and old-fashioned woodcuts of garden scenes and plants ably enhance the text. The large, spiral-bound book, five to eight times the volume of its original predecessor, lays open easily.... There is excellent material on the political and economic imperatives for local food production, climate and microclimate, plants, soils, water management, garden pests, seeds, composting and basic garden layout. I really like the book and respect the hard work it took to assemble so much useful information on crops, soil, and climates. ...the template Rayner has created is an exemplary model for parallel work to be done in any major ecoregion. She has delved deeply into the synergistic implications of climate - including climate change - topography, transportation, demographics, microclimates, and much more... ...should be a first go-to reference for sustainable food system designers, home gardeners, and permaculture designers in the mountain Southwest." -- Peter Bane, Permaculture Activist Magazine, Winter 2013-2014 "Now in an expanded fourth edition with nearly four times as much information as the third edition, Growing Food in the Southwest Mountains is a methodical, user-friendly, in-depth guide written especially for people living in the states of California, Nevada, Utah, Arizona Colorado and New Mexico. Since the current industrial agriculture system relies heavily on fossil fuel consumption to produce and transport peak food, the need for alternatives -- including local, sustainable food supplies -- is ever-increasing. Growing Food in the Southwest Mountains discusses the basics of the Southwest Mountain climate, how to create permaculture zones, warnings against invasive species, tips for creating garden-friendly eco-communities, soil maintenance advice, watering strategies, advice for dealing with so-called 'pests,' a brief history of Southwestern food traditions and much more." --Midwest Book Review "If every region in North America had a handbook like this, we would be seven leagues ahead of where we now are in Permaculture education. The author and publishers are to be commended for creating a first-class resource." — Cathy Holt (about the 3rd edition) The Permaculture Activist magazine, Winter 2002/2003 “Lisa Rayner's new edition of this little masterpiece provides you with principles for living and eating in harmony with northern Arizona's natural habitats. It is a primer on how to change our food production and consumption strategies to sustain the natural and cultural heritage of our region.” — Dr. Gary Paul Nabhan (about the 3rd edition) Author of Coming Home to Eat: The Pleasures and Politics of Local Foods. from the preface Copyright (c) 2013 280 pages. 8.5 inches by 11 inches. Color cover, 400+ black and white illustrations.

Design for Ecological Democracy

Design for Ecological Democracy

Winner, 2007 Davidoff Award presented by the Association of Collegiate Schools of Planning (ACSP), Winner, Scholarly Illustrated Category, 2007 AAUP Book Jacket and Journal Show. and Winner of the Architecture & Urban Planning category in the 2006 Professional/Scholarly Publishing Annual Awards Competition presented by the Association of American Publishers, Inc. Over the last fifty years, the process of community building has been lost in the process of city building. City and suburban design divides us from others in our communities, destroys natural habitats, and fails to provide a joyful context for our lives. In Design for Ecological Democracy, Randolph Hester proposes a remedy for our urban anomie. He outlines new principles for urban design that will allow us to forge connections with our fellow citizens and our natural environment. He demonstrates these principles with abundantly illustrated examples—drawn from forty years of design and planning practice—showing how we can design cities that are ecologically resilient, that enhance community, and that give us pleasure. Hester argues that it is only by combining the powerful forces of ecology and democracy that the needed revolution in design will take place. Democracy bestows freedom; ecology creates responsible freedom by explaining our interconnectedness with all creatures. Hester's new design principles are founded on three fundamental issues that integrate democracy and ecology: enabling form, resilient form, and impelling form. Urban design must enable us to be communities rather than zoning-segregated enclaves and to function as informed democracies. A simple bench at a centrally located post office, for example, provides an opportunity for connection and shared experience. Cities must be ecologically resilient rather than ecologically imperiled, adaptable to the surrounding ecology rather than dependent on technological fixes. Resilient form turns increased urban density, for example, into an advantage. And cities should impel us by joy rather than compel us by fear; good cities enrich us rather than limit us. Design for Ecological Democracy is essential reading for designers, planners, environmentalists, community activists, and anyone else who wants to improve a local community.

The Green Gardener

Sustainable Gardening in Your Own Backyard

The Green Gardener

More and more people are looking for practical ways to do something about critical environmental problems such as global warming, water shortage, the loss of biodiversity, and chemical-laden food. In this timely and very down-to-earth book, Gardening Australia presenter Josh Byrne shows how you can contribute to a cleaner, greener world in your own backyard: save energy through climate-conscious garden design and the careful selection of materials create habitat for wildlife by planting native species and providing ponds and hiding places grow your own vegetables and fruit, however limited your garden space save water by selecting water-wise plants, mulching, using drip irrigation, and reusing greywater Whether your garden is big or small, whether you're new to gardening or an old hand, The Green Gardener has the ideas, the information and, above all, the simple instructions you need to create a productive, planet-friendly plot.