The Diamond Chariot

Erast Fandorin 10

The Diamond Chariot

A stunning and epic finale to the series, pitting Fandorin against both Ninjas and terrorists on the Trans-Siberian Express! The first of the interlinked plotlines is set in Russia during the Russo-Japanese War in 1905. Fandorin is charged with protecting the Trans-Siberian Railway from Japanese sabotage in a pacy adventure filled with double agents and ticking bombs. Then we travel back to the Japan of the late 1870s. This is the story of Fandorin's arrival and life in Yokohama, his first meeting with Masa and the martial arts education that came in so handy later. He investigates the death of a Russian ship-captain, fights for a woman, exposes double-agents in the Japanese police, fights against, and then with the ninjas, and becomes embroiled in a shocking finale that interweaves the two stories and ties up the series as a whole.

The Thorn Queen

A Novel

The Thorn Queen

Welcome to Glendoch! Hidden to most, this glacial world once crackled with alchemy. Now it waits for war—divided and bound by strict rules. So when twelve-year-old Meylyne falls from a tree onto Glendoch’s sickly prince, she must flee or face imprisonment in the Shadow-Cellars. The only way she may return home is with a cure for the prince’s peculiar disease. Convinced she will perish, Meylyne and her companions embark on their journey—and before they know it, they are knee-deep in a plot to sink Glendoch into shadow, like other worlds before it. Poisoned guardians, cursed wizards, and cunning witch-spirits bound into wands are just some of the dangers that dot the way of their travels. And behind it all is the Thorn Queen. Mysteriously magnetic (or murderously vengeful, depending on whose side you’re on), she is always one step ahead of them . . .

Overkill

Sex and Violence in Contemporary Russian Popular Culture

Overkill

Perestroika and the end of the Soviet Union transformed every aspect of life in Russia, and as hope began to give way to pessimism, popular culture came to reflect the anxiety and despair felt by more and more Russians. Free from censorship for the first time in Russia's history, the popular culture industry (publishing, film, and television) began to disseminate works that featured increasingly explicit images and descriptions of sex and violence. In Overkill, Eliot Borenstein explores this lurid and often-disturbing cultural landscape in close, imaginative readings of such works as You're Just a Slut, My Dear! (Ty prosto shliukha, dorogaia!), a novel about sexual slavery and illegal organ harvesting; the Nympho trilogy of books featuring a Chechen-fighting sex addict; and the Mad Dog and Antikiller series of books and films recounting, respectively, the exploits of the Russian Rambo and an assassin killing in the cause of justice. Borenstein argues that the popular cultural products consumed in the post-perestroika era were more than just diversions; they allowed Russians to indulge their despair over economic woes and everyday threats. At the same time, they built a notion of nationalism or heroism that could be maintained even under the most miserable of social conditions, when consumers felt most powerless. For Borenstein, the myriad depictions of deviance in pornographic and also detectiv fiction, with their patently excessive and appalling details of social and moral decay, represented the popular culture industry's response to the otherwise unimaginable scale of Russia's national collapse. "The full sense of collapse," he writes, "required a panoptic view that only the media and culture industry were eager to provide, amalgamating national collapse into one master narrative that would then be readily available to most individuals as a framework for understanding their own suffering and their own fears."

Ramayana at a Glance

Ramayana at a Glance


Novels by Boris Akunin

Erast Fandorin, F. M. (Novel), Murder on the Leviathan, Nicholas Fandorin, She Lover of Death, Sister Pelagia, Spe

Novels by Boris Akunin

Please note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. Commentary (novels not included). Pages: 18. Chapters: Erast Fandorin, F.M. (novel), Murder on the Leviathan, Nicholas Fandorin, She Lover of Death, Sister Pelagia, Special Assignments, The Coronation (novel), The Death of Achilles, The Diamond Chariot, The State Counsellor, The Turkish Gambit, The Winter Queen (novel). Excerpt: Erast Petrovich Fandorin (Russian: ) is a fictional 19th-century Russian detective and the hero of a series of Russian historical detective novels by Boris Akunin. The first Fandorin novel was published in Russia in 1998, and the latest was published in December 2009. More than 15 million copies of Fandorin novels have been sold as of May 2006, even though the novels were freely available from many Russian web-sites and the hard-copies were relatively expensive by Russian standards. New books in the Fandorin series typically sell over 200,000 copies in the first week alone, with an unparalleled (for mystery novels) first edition of 50,000 copies for the first books to 500,000 copies for the last. In Russia, the Fandorin series rivals The Lord of the Rings or Harry Potter in popularity. The English translations of the novels have been critically acclaimed by, among others, Ruth Rendell. In the Soviet Union, detective novels enjoyed mass popularity. Although they were seen as a "low genre" by the communist officials, both local (such as Vayner brothers and Julian Semenov), and foreign detective novels have always been avidly coveted. After the collapse of the Soviet Union, many trashy detective novels were published that featured a lot of gore and sex. Akunin's wife, in common with many other Russians, started to enjoy reading this genre of literature. However, she did not want to be seen reading the novels and she always wrapped them in brown paper to prevent people from seeing what she was reading. This...

The Diamond

A Present for Young People

The Diamond


The Diamond Mines of South Africa

Some Account of Their Rise and Development

The Diamond Mines of South Africa

First published in 1902, this work describes the discovery and development of diamond mines in South Africa.

The Chariot to Diamond City

The Chariot to Diamond City

The Chariot to Diamond City is the remarkable and uplifting story of six children who all share the same birthday. They are each guided by a magnificent Queen hailing from a place that is very near to the “Heavenly Realm” and learn of their great mission. They were all born on Earth at precisely the time their country and the world would need them most. On the dawn of their ninth birthday the Queen embarks upon a well-orchestrated plan, hoping that together, the children will help ignite world peace by returning America to the Founding Father's original intentions . . . that their country might be the guiding light for all of humanity. The Queen invites them to join her in a leap of faith by flying toward an extraordinary journey, setting them on the path to fulfill their sacred destiny. Universal in its appeal to children and adults alike, this is a timeless tale of great importance. It encourages the reader to follow one's own heart and stand up for the dream of living in a peaceful world . . . a world based on cooperation, equality, friendship, and trust. Join these courageous children in the magic and wonder of their life-changing lessons that are at times humorous, suspenseful, heartfelt, and often challenging. They encounter a truly unique cast of unforgettable characters in one incredible experience after another and become The Guardians of Freedom!