The Theory of the Leisure Class

The Theory of the Leisure Class

Classic of economic and social theory offers satiric examination of the hollowness and falsity suggested by the term "conspicuous consumption," exposing the emptiness of many standards of taste, education, dress, and culture.

The Theory of the Leisure Class

The Theory of the Leisure Class

Unlike some other reproductions of classic texts (1) We have not used OCR(Optical Character Recognition), as this leads to bad quality books with introduced typos. (2) In books where there are images such as portraits, maps, sketches etc We have endeavoured to keep the quality of these images, so they represent accurately the original artefact. Although occasionally there may be certain imperfections with these old texts, we feel they deserve to be made available for future generations to enjoy.

The Tourist

A New Theory of the Leisure Class

The Tourist

In this classic analysis of travel and sightseeing, author Dean MacCannell brings social scientific understandings to bear on tourism in the postindustrial age, during which the middle class has acquired leisure time for international travel. In The Tourist—now with a new introduction framing it as part of a broader contemporary social and cultural analysis—the author examines notions of authenticity, high and low culture, and the construction of social reality around tourism.

Thorstein Veblen

Theorist of the Leisure Class

Thorstein Veblen

Fired by Stanford and the University of Chicago but recommended by his peers to the presidency of the American Economic Association, Thorstein Veblen remains a baffling figure. In part because he was an eccentric who shunned publicity. Veblen is best known to the public as coiner of the term "conspicuous consumption", and known to scholars as one of many social critics of the reform-minded Progressive Era. This is a critical biography, originally published as "The Bard of Savagery". It attempts to unravel the riddles that surround his reputation, and to assess his varied and important contributions to modern social theory.

The Economic Theory of the Leisure Class

The Economic Theory of the Leisure Class

Bukharin completed this work in 1914; it represented an attempt to grapple with the Austrian School of political economy, as represented chiefly by Eugen von Böhm-Bawerk. Bukharin interprets the school as reflecting the social position of the rentier stratum of the capitalist class, which tends to view the economy from the point of view of consumption rather than production. But this is merely the introduction to a close consideration of the theory of marginal utility as contrasted with the labor theory of value which formed the starting point of both Marxism and classical economics. His discussion, therefore, while it does not deal with the many changes and refinements of neoclassical economics, does contrast, in polemical form, Marxism with the fundamental premises of modern academic economics. His discussion of "subjective" and "objective" value definitions, in particular, will help clarify for many the essential differences that distinguish Marxist political economy from other schools.

The Theory of Business Enterprise

Nature, Causes, Utility & Drift of Business Enterprise (A Political Economy Book)

The Theory of Business Enterprise

This eBook edition of "The Theory of Business Enterprise" has been formatted to the highest digital standards and adjusted for readability on all devices. The Theory of Business Enterprise is a political economy book that looks at the growing corporate domination of culture and the economy. At its heart The Theory of Business Enterprise is an analysis of two intertwined but clashing motivations; that of business and that of industry. Business is the making of profits. Industry is the making of goods. "The captains of industry" curtailed production in order to keep prices and profits high. The worst fears of businessmen was a "free run of production" which would essentially collapse all profits. In this book, which was published in 1904 during the height of American concern with the growth of business combinations and trusts, Veblen employed his evolutionary analysis to explain these new forms. He saw them as a consequence of the growth of industrial processes in a context of small business firms that had evolved earlier to organize craft production. Thorstein Veblen (1857-1929) was an American economist and sociologist. He is well known as a witty critic of capitalism. Veblen is famous for the idea of "conspicuous consumption." Conspicuous consumption, along with "conspicuous leisure," is performed to demonstrate wealth or mark social status. Veblen explains the concept in his best-known book, The Theory of the Leisure Class. Within the history of economic thought, Veblen is considered the leader of the institutional economics movement. Veblen's distinction between "institutions" and "technology" is still called the Veblenian dichotomy by contemporary economists.

BUSINESS & ECONOMICS Premium Collection: 30+ Titles in One Volume: The Theory of Business Enterprise, The Higher Learning in America, The Vested Interests and the Common Man, On the Nature of Capital…

The Theory of the Leisure Class, The Beginning of Ownership, The Preconceptions of Economic Science, The Industrial System and the Captains of Industry, The Socialist Economics of Karl Marx…

BUSINESS & ECONOMICS Premium Collection: 30+ Titles in One Volume: The Theory of Business Enterprise, The Higher Learning in America, The Vested Interests and the Common Man, On the Nature of Capital…

This carefully crafted ebook: "BUSINESS & ECONOMICS Premium Collection: 30+ Titles in One Volume: The Theory of Business Enterprise, The Higher Learning in America, The Vested Interests and the Common Man, On the Nature of Capital…" is formatted for your eReader with a functional and detailed table of contents. Thorstein Veblen (1857-1929) was an American economist and sociologist. He is well known as a witty critic of capitalism. Veblen is famous for the idea of "conspicuous consumption." Conspicuous consumption, along with "conspicuous leisure," is performed to demonstrate wealth or mark social status. Content: The Theory of the Leisure Class The Theory of Business Enterprise The Instinct of Workmanship and the State of the Industrial Arts The Higher Learning in America Imperial Germany and the Industrial Revolution The Vested Interests and the Common Man The Engineers and the Price System The Place of Science in Modern Civilisation The Evolution of the Scientific Point of View Why Is Economics Not an Evolutionary Science? The Preconceptions of Economic Science Professor Clark's Economics The Limitations of Marginal Utility Gustav Schmoller's Economics Industrial and Pecuniary Employments On the Nature of Capital Some Neglected Points in the Theory of Socialism The Socialist Economics of Karl Marx Böhm-Bawerk's Definition of Capital and the Source of Wages The Overproduction Fallacy The Price of Wheat since 1867 Adolph Wagner's New Treatise The Food Supply and the Price of Wheat The Army of the Commonweal The Economic Theory of Women's Dress The Instinct of Workmanship and the Irksomeness of Labor The Beginning of Ownership The Barbarian Status of Women Mr. Cummings's Strictures on "The Theory of the Leisure Class" The Later Railway Combinations Levasseur on Hand and Machine Labor… The Use of Loan Credit in Modern Business Credit and Prices Fisher's Capital and Income Fisher's Rate of Interest The Industrial System and the Captains of Industry ...

Conspicuous Consumption

Conspicuous Consumption

The perfect books for the true book lover, Penguin's Great Ideas series features twelve more groundbreaking works by some of history's most prodigious thinkers. Each volume is beautifully packaged with a unique type-driven design that highlights the bookmaker's art. Offering great literature in great packages at great prices, this series is ideal for those readers who want to explore and savor the Great Ideas that have shaped our world With its wry portrayal of a shallow, materialistic 'leisure class' obsessed by clothes, cars, consumer goods and climbing the social ladder, this withering satire on modern capitalism is as pertinent today as it was when it was written over a century ago.