The Unexpected Joy of Being Sober

Discovering a happy, healthy, wealthy alcohol-free life

The Unexpected Joy of Being Sober

THE SUNDAY TIMES BESTSELLER 'Not remotely preachy' - The Times 'Jaunty, shrewd and convincing' - Sunday Telegraph 'Admirably honest, light, bubbly and remarkably rarely annoying.' - Alice O'Keeffe, Guardian 'Truthful, modern and real' - Stylist 'Brave, witty and brilliantly written' - Marie Claire Ever sworn off alcohol for a month and found yourself drinking by the 7th? Think there's 'no point' in just one drink? Welcome! There are millions of us. 64% of Brits want to drink less. Catherine Gray was stuck in a hellish whirligig of Drink, Make horrible decisions, Hangover, Repeat. She had her fair share of 'drunk tank' jail cells and topless-in-a-hot-tub misadventures. But this book goes beyond the binges and blackouts to deep-dive into uncharted territory: What happens after you quit drinking? This gripping, heart-breaking and witty book takes us down the rabbit-hole of an alternative reality. A life with zero hangovers, through sober weddings, sex, Christmases and breakups. In The Unexpected Joy of Being Sober, Catherine Gray shines a light on society's drink-pushing and talks to top neuroscientists and psychologists about why we drink, delving into the science behind what it does to our brains and bodies. Much more than a tale from the netherworld of addicted drinking, this book is about the escape, and why a sober life can be more intoxicating than you ever imagined. Whether you're a hopelessly devoted drinker, merely sober-curious, or you've already ditched the drink, you will love this book. 'Haunting, admirable and enlightening' - The Pool 'A riveting, raw, yet humorous memoir with actionable advice.' - Annie Grace, author of This Naked Mind 'Like listening to your best friend teach you to be sober. Lighthearted but serious, it's packed with ideas, tools, tips and, most importantly, reasons for living a sober life.'- Eric Zimmer, host of podcast The One You Feed 'Gray's fizzy writing succeeds in making this potentially boring-as-hell subject both engaging and highly seductive' - The Bookseller 'Her exquisitely crafted thoughts on the joys of being sober are not only deeply honest and pragmatic, but she manages to infuse tons of humor. This is a delightful, informative, and compelling read for all those who are sober or seeking sobriety.' - Sasha Tozzi, Huffington Post

The Unexpected Joy of Being Sober Journal

The Unexpected Joy of Being Sober Journal

Ever sworn off alcohol for a month and found yourself drinking by the 7th? Think there's 'no point' in just one drink? Welcome! Quitting drinking, whether for a month or for life, is enormously satisfying, but also fiendishly difficult. -There's the getting started ('But I have that party next week!') -There's the feeling clenched and socially anxious. -Throw in a sizeable amount of social pressure and suspicious questions ('So, do you have a drinking problem?' -Finally, chuck in the hundreds of pro-drinking messages we see every day; films where a round of shots always comes with a whoop; fridge magnets that say 'I don't trust people who don't drink'; pub clapboards announcing 'Strong people need strong drinks'; and memes declaring 'Beer: it's a holiday in a glass.' Whew. It's no wonder we find it tricky to stay teetotal. But don't worry. We're going to tackle all of the above. I'm going to give you tools that enable you to clear all of these stumbling blocks with the grace of a gazelle. So, let's get started, shall we? PRAISE FOR CATHERINE GRAY'S WRITING: "An icon of the Quit Lit movement." Condé Nast Traveller "Fascinating." Bryony Gordon. "Not remotely preachy." The Times "Jaunty, shrewd and convincing." The Telegraph "Admirably honest, light, bubbly and remarkably rarely annoying." The Guardian "Truthful, modern and real." Stylist "Brave, witty and brilliantly written." Marie Claire "Haunting, admirable and enlightening." The Pool

The Unexpected Joy of Being Single

Locating happily-single serenity

The Unexpected Joy of Being Single

* 'This refreshing, unusual book needs to exist. A culture shift which repositions a single person as someone who is relationship-free, complete, and not lacking is long overdue.' - The i * Having a secret single freak-out? Feeling the red, heart-shaped urgency intensify as the years roll on by? Oh hi! You're in the right place. Over half of Brits aged 25-44 are now single. It's become the norm to remain solo until much later in life, given the average marriage ages of 35 (women) and 38 (men). Many of us are choosing never to marry at all. But society, films, song lyrics and our parents are adamant that a happy ending has to be couple-shaped. That we're incomplete without an 'other half'*, like a bisected panto pony. Cue: single sorrow. Dating like it's a job. Spending half our lives waiting for somebody-we-fancy to text us back. Feeling haunted by the terms 'spinster' or 'confirmed bachelor.' Catherine Gray took a whole year off dating to find single satisfaction. She lifted the lid on the reasons behind the global single revolution, explored the bizarre ways cultures single-shame, detached from 'all the good ones are gone!' panic and debunked the myth that married people are much happier. Let's start the reverse brainwash, in order to locate - and luxuriate in - single happiness. Are you in? *Spoiler: you're already whole PRAISE FOR CATHERINE GRAY'S WRITING: "Fascinating." Bryony Gordon. "Not remotely preachy." The Times "Jaunty, shrewd and convincing." The Telegraph "Admirably honest, light, bubbly and remarkably rarely annoying." The Guardian "Truthful, modern and real." Stylist "Brave, witty and brilliantly written." Marie Claire "Haunting, admirable and enlightening." The Pool

The Unexpected Joy of the Ordinary

The Unexpected Joy of the Ordinary

**From the Sunday Times Bestselling Author** This sensible and life-affirming book is a love letter to an average life beautifully lived - The Telegraph. Ordinary. Average. Normal. The everyday is the wall-to-wall humdrum we seek to upgrade, like a fifties carpet we long to replace. More money. A bigger house. A better body. An upgraded career. The ultimate relationship. A highly inconvenient psychological phenomenon called 'the hedonic treadmill' has us eternally questing for more. Catherine Gray was a grandmaster in eye-rolling the ordinary, and the art of everlasting reaching. Until the daemon of depression made her re-think everything. Knitting together personal storytelling and illuminating science, this book probes great minds in neuroscience and psychology.It explodes 'extraordinary-seeking' myths such as big bucks means big happiness, expensive weddings predict future happiness, high intensity exercise is the best kind, and the workaday is less important than the showreel. This soulful, hilarious and life-affirming book is a manifesto on how to outwit the hedonic treadmill and retrain our negatively-biased brains. But most of all, it's a love letter to an average life beautifully lived. Because maybe, just maybe, an ordinary life is the most satisfying one of all. PRAISE FOR CATHERINE GRAY'S WRITING: "Uplifting and inspiring" The Evening Standard "Not remotely preachy" The Times "Jaunty, shrewd and convincing" The Telegraph "Admirably honest, light, bubbly and remarkably rarely annoying" The Guardian "An empathetic, warm and hilarious tale from a hugely likeable human" The Lancet Psychiatry

Get Up

A 12-Step Guide to Recovery for Misfits, Freaks, and Weirdos

Get Up

A (Former) Skeptic’s Guide to the 12-Step Program Knowledge from a personal journey. Experiences with addiction vastly differ, but something can be learned from everyone’s journey—especially those who achieve sobriety. Author Bucky Sinister penned this book because he had something to share from his own journey, a realization that completely changed his outlook on recovery. This smart and snide book is his testament to the effectiveness of the 12-Step Program, a path to recovery that he never expected to go down (and work). A tough-love approach to recovery. As a poet, author, and comedian, Sinister doesn’t hold back from speaking the truth in this book. He speaks bluntly about addiction and his own struggles with it. Sinister appeals to those who are turned off by the usual recovery self-helps. He talks straight to readers who struggle to buy into the effectiveness of the 12-Step Program—particularly those like Sinister, an atheist, who have problems with the “higher power” concept intertwined with the program. A different kind of “self-help”. Sinister’s book presents itself as self-help, but don’t expect it to have the same tone as others you’ve read. The book is full of Sinister’s comedic touch, colorful language, and stories from “scumbags” that contain life-saving wisdom. An unabashed testimony to Sinister’s personal journey to sobriety and those of others, this recovery book is sure to educate, entertain, and inspire. Read Bucky Sinister’s Get Up: A 12-Step Guide to Recovery for Misfits, Freaks, and Weirdos and find… • A different outlook on the 12-Step Program • Raw and honest stories of addiction and staying sober • A source of both light laughter and cutting wisdom for those on the path to recovery Readers of books such as The Unexpected Joy of Being Sober; Recovery: Freedom from Our Addictions; and Staying Sober Without God will find further guidance and inspiration in Get Up, which should be the next book for you.

The Phone Addiction Workbook

How to Identify Smartphone Dependency, Stop Compulsive Behavior and Develop a Healthy Relationship with Your Devices

The Phone Addiction Workbook

Stop scrolling and start living! Build healthier relationships between you, your smartphone and all your devices, including tips to reduce social media obsession, notification anxiety and other unhealthy habits. Your smartphone is a powerful device that has fundamentally changed your life—no doubt improving it in many ways. And while you don’t need to give up your smartphone completely, if your day to day is filled with endless, anxiety-inducing checking, swiping and liking, then you need this helpful, step-by-step workbook to take back control of your life. Phone addiction is similar to gambling addiction and substance abuse. Its consequences include stress, depression, insomnia, intimacy issues and more. Written by an experienced psychotherapist, couples therapist and former telecommunications industry insider, The Phone Addiction Workbook’s program offers the blueprint for understanding addictive behavior and how it controls you. Weekly charts, practical tips and interactive activities help you stop unhealthy behavior and make lasting change.

Unexpected Joy at Dawn

Unexpected Joy at Dawn

Fifteen years ago, Mama said, starting her story, I came to Lagos from Ghana. I came to Nigeria because I was considered an alien in that country. The government of Ghana passed a law asking all aliens without resident permits to regularise their stay in the country'. This story of migration, identities and lives undermined by cynical and xenophobic politics pushed to its logical and terrible conclusion pertains to the Ghanaian orders of `alien compliance' issued in 1970-1971, which determined to force all non-ethnic Ghanaians, so called illegal immigrants, to return to their - so stipulated - `home'. The novel thus touches on concerns of deeper relevance to the politics of race and migration of the twenty first century.

Mrs D is Going Without

I used to be a boozy housewife. Now I'm not. This is my book.

Mrs D is Going Without

Lotta Dann was in trouble - her fun drinking habit had slowly morphed into an obsessive hunger for wine. One bottle a night was never quite enough. When she tried to cut down, she found it nearly impossible to have an alcohol-free day. Everyone around could see her drinking, but no one realised what a serious problem it was. She was high-functioning, fun-loving Lotta, not some messy, hopeless drunk. Only Lotta knew how sick and twisted her thinking about wine had become. Desperate and miserable, she was falling deeper and deeper into a boozy hellhole and running out of ideas about what she could do to stop it. What's a girl to do when her beloved wine becomes the enemy? Here's what Lotta did. She stopped drinking and secretly started a blog that charted the highs and lows of learning to live without alcohol. Mrs D was anonymous, honest and, as Lotta would discover, surrounded by people who would help her on her journey, and whom she could help in return.

New Outlook

New Outlook