Why We Write About Ourselves

Twenty Memoirists on Why They Expose Themselves (and Others) in the Name of Literature

Why We Write About Ourselves

In the voices of twenty landmark memoirists—including New York Times bestselling authors Cheryl Strayed, Sue Monk Kidd, and Pat Conroy—a definitive text on the craft of autobiographical writing, indispensable for amateur and professional writers alike. For readers of Mary Karr’s The Art of Memoir and Judith Barrington’s Writing the Memoir, this follow-up to editor Meredith Maran’s acclaimed writers’ handbook, Why We Write, offers inspiration, encouragement, and pithy, practical advice for bloggers, journal-keepers, aspiring essayists, and memoirists. Curated and edited by Maran, herself an acclaimed author and book critic, these memoirists share the lessons they’ve learned through years of honing their craft. They reveal what drives them to tell their personal stories and examine the nuts and bolts of how they do it. Speaking frankly about issues ranging from turning oneself into an authentic, compelling character to exposing hard truths, these outstanding authors disclose what keeps them going, what gets in their way, and what they love most—and least—about writing about themselves. “It's possible that Why We Write About Ourselves is the first compilation of memoirists at the top of their game seriously and thoughtfully considering the genre.” – LA Times From the Trade Paperback edition.

Recording Oral History

A Guide for the Humanities and Social Sciences

Recording Oral History

In iRecording Oral History, Second Editioni, Valerie Raleigh Yow builds on the foundation of her classic text with a fully updated and substantially expanded new edition. One of the most widely used and highly regarded textbooks ever published in the field, Yows seminal work now includes illuminating new material on using the internet, an examination of the interactions between oral history and memory processes, and exploration into testimony analysis and the interpretation of meanings in different contexts. This exceptional new edition will interest researchers and students in a wide variety of disciplines including history, sociology, anthropology, education, psychology, social work and ethnographic methods.

For Better or Worse!

For Better or Worse!

"Gordon Mtakati was born on the 19th of January 1965 in Cape Town, South Africa, and grew up in Nyanga and Langa Townships, which are also in Cape Town. At present he lives in Midrand, Johannesburg, in the Gauteng Province. His professional background is in human resources management and development, sales and marketing, and writes books as a hobby. He has a Master's degree in Business Administration, and enjoys political debates about global issues. He enjoys assisting others by volunteering in programs such as the American Field Services (AFS) exchange program, and other community services. He is a huge soccer supporter for his national team, Bafana Bafana, and the Kaizer Chiefs football club. Gordon appreciates seeing people live a good quality of life in a peaceful and crime free environment. He seriously dislikes racism. He believes in Ubuntu (humanity) and strives to do good for others as part of his values.

Codependents' Guide to the Twelve Steps

New Stories

Codependents' Guide to the Twelve Steps

Provides a detailed explanation of the Twelve-Step program designed by Alcoholics Anonymous, accompanied by advice on how to apply the program to codependent issues and cross-addiction

Conversations with Strangers

Ideas about Writing for Adult Students

Conversations with Strangers

Ideas about writing for adult students: Discussion sheets on the writing process, about language and about the role of the teacher as well as themes and beginnings.

Teaching, A Life's Work

A Mother–Daughter Dialogue

Teaching, A Life's Work

A must-read for new teachers and seasoned practitioners, this unique book presents Sonia Nieto and Alicia López, mother and daughter writing about the trajectories, vision, and values that brought them to teaching, including the ups and downs they have experienced and the reasons why they have stubbornly remained in one of the oldest, most difficult, and most rewarding of professions. Drawing on their extensive experience as educators in school and university classrooms, they reflect on what it means to teach young people, prospective teachers, and future academics in our complex, dynamic, and multicultural society. Teaching, A Life’s Work is at once theoretical and practical, reflective and critical, personal, professional, and political. Nieto and López document their reasons for becoming teachers and share some of the most important lessons they have learned along the way. Using journals, blogs, current writings, and their research, they explore how their views on curriculum, pedagogy, and the field of education itself have evolved over the years. “Riveting and beautiful! This book offers a full basket of wisdom wrapped up in personal stories of learning to teach.” —Christine Sleeter, California State University Monterey Bay “Nieto and López give us the gift of two lifetimes of loving commitment to teaching children and changing the world.” —Wayne Au, University of Washington Bothell “A genuine rarity! This dialog allows us insight into the differences and similarities across generations in teacher education, curriculum, and classroom practices.” —David C. Berliner, Arizona State University

Ourselves

Why We Are Who We Are

Ourselves

This book delves into how we come to terms with ourselves, with other people, and with the world in general. It is about how we come to be what we are, and to think the way we do. It is a book about influences on this process. A particular influence to which Smith gives central consideration is language, not just in terms of the communicative networks in which it engages us--the “information” that presents itself to us--but in the largely unsuspected framework for thought that lies within language itself. He also considers deeply the role of technology. This is a book of description, not of explanations--these are two quite different intellectual territories. Smith writes about what can be observed, not philosophized about. Thus he does not discuss the inner workings of the human brain. His claim is that what he is interested in--thinking, learning, understanding, remembering--have never been found in the brain. The aim is to describe the scope and limits for how we can be seen to think, learn, understand, and remember--but not to “explain” such behavior by recourse to hypothetical inner entities. Ourselves speaks especially to educators. It outlines the possibilities and limitations inherent in all of us. It delineates who we are, but also stresses that no two people are the same, that what we become depends on our journeys in life and the people we encounter on the way. The formal part of learning that is called education is particularly sensitive to the role of people who organize critical experiences for us, our teachers. The brief summaries at the end of each chapter reinforce and highlight points that are of particular relevance to teachers. Researchers, professionals, and graduate students across the fields of literacy education, psychology of reading, learning theory, human learning, educational psychology, and psycholinguistics will find this book compelling.

Writing Ourselves Whole

Using the Power of Your Own Creativity to Recover and Heal from Sexual Trauma

Writing Ourselves Whole

Creating books that will change your life Healing victims of sexual assault through transformative journaling: One in six women is the victim of sexual assault. Using her own hard-won wisdom, author Jen Cross shows how to heal through journaling and personal writing. Rape victims and victims of other sexual abuse: Writing Ourselves Whole is a collection of essays and creative writing encouragements for sexual trauma survivors who want to risk writing a different story. Each short chapter offers encouragement, experience, and exercises. Sections focus on writing as a transformative practice, embodying our story, how to write trauma without retraumatization, writing joy and desire, and more. How to change your life: When you can find language for the stories that are locked inside, you can change your life. Talk therapy can only go so far for the millions of Americans struggling in the aftermath of sexual abuse and sexual assault, as well as for their partners, families, and caregivers. Survivors of childhood sexual trauma are strong and vulnerable enough to bear witness to each other's truths, to share and learn new languages for our experiences, to throw over the simplistic “victim” and “survivor” narratives that permeate mainstream media in favor of narratives that are fragmented, complicated, messy, and ultimately more whole. Sexual assault survivors can heal themselves: Sexual trauma survivor communities (and their allies) have the capacity to hold and hear one another's stories – we do not have to relegate ourselves solely to the individual isolation of the therapist's office. We do not need to be afraid, as a community of fractured, harmed and healing survivors, of reaching out to and supporting one another. Books such as Julia Cameron's The Artist's Way, Natalie Goldberg's Writing Down the Bones and Louise DeSalvo's Writing as a Way of Healing beautifully describe the power of writing and offer practices for readers to engage with individually. Yet few creative writing or creative recovery books explicitly address sexual trauma survivor struggles to find language for their experience, nor do they describe the empowerment we might find in discovering language and expression for our delight, desire, and joy as well as our loss and pain. Writing Ourselves Whole specifically addresses the power of connecting with others who share our experience and can support us in finding language for subjects we not only are not supposed to talk about in polite company, but aren't even supposed to articulate to ourselves. Transformative journaling: Writing Ourselves Whole acknowledges the radical and profound impact of a creative healing community for trauma survivors, and includes suggestions for those seeking to create a peer writing group in their own communities. Writing Ourselves Whole rises out of the intersection of Natalie Goldberg's groundbreaking Writing Down the Bones, the powerful Trauma and Recovery by Judith Herman, and the hopeful, angry struggle of Inga Muscio's Cunt. What You'll Learn Inside Writing Ourselves Whole: How to reconnect with your creative instinct through freewriting How freewriting can help you reclaim the parts of yourself, and your history, that you were never supposed to be able to name How "restorying" the old myths about sexual trauma survivors can set you free How a consistent writing practice can help reconnect you with your creative genius How (and why) to make writing part of your regular self-care routine — and why, if you don’t have a self-care routine, it’s time to develop one Why writing about your desires is at least as important as writing about violence The profound joy and power of writing in community and solidarity with other survivors

History, what and Why?

Ancient, Modern, and Postmodern Perspectives

History, what and Why?

History: What and Why? is a highly accessible introductory survey of historians' views about the nature and purpose of their subject. It offers a historical perspective and clear guide to contemporary debates about the nature and purpose of history, and a discussion of the traditional model of history as an account of the past 'as it was'. It assesses the challenges to orthodox views and examines the impact of Marxism, feminism and post-colonialism on the study of history. This second edition has been updated to reflect the continuing, and still increasing, debate surrounding these issues. In particular it discusses: historians' fear of postmodernism holocaust denial and the Irving/Lipstadt libel trial the future of the past in the light of the postmodern challenge. For anyone teaching, learning or studying history, this is a must.